CANDIDATES

Here at Engage we are committed to securing all our candidates the best opportunities to further their career. However, our role doesn’t just end when you are offered a new position. We’re here to support you through the whole process of moving jobs, stressful as it can sometimes be. Here are some basic tips that we’ve put together from our years of experience that may be of some help :

Writing your CV

Many of the most sought after candidates are those that have shown a longstanding commitment and success over a number of years in a single job. As a result, there may not have been any need to put together a CV and being asked to do so can feel a little daunting. Here are some simple guidelines to work from when that moment comes about –

  • Try and keep the CV simple and concise. It’s tempting to try and show what you can do by going through every project and your key role in ensuring it’s success. Don’t. Save that level of detail for the interview. If you can keep your CV to 2 pages great. If not, then 3, maximum.
  • Related to the above, remember that your CV also demonstrates your ability to communicate effectively, and your professionalism. It sounds obvious, but check there are no glaring spelling mistakes or grammatical errors.
  • Presenting yourself with a positive emphasis is a good thing. It might feel difficult to praise yourself sometimes, but remember a CV is a sales tool, and the thing you’re selling is you. However, beware straying across the line of positivity into bragging.
  • It’s a matter of personal choice, but take care not to be too ‘cheesy’ in a CV. Inspirational quotes and the like can make some readers eyes roll. It’s best not to take the risk.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask if you’re unsure. Our consultants read hundreds of CV’s a day. If you’ve not written one for a while, call up and have a chat. We’ll always be happy to help.

Resigning and the Counter Offer

Nobody should want to burn bridges in business. So how do you resign gracefully? Here’s a few handy tips on staying “just friends” with your old employer –

  • It seems obvious, but don’t resign until you have a firm, written, offer of employment. It can be incredibly exciting when you leave an interview with words of praise ringing in your ears, and the promise of a spectacular new job. Flip the coin though, and it can be mortifying when that offer gets with drawn “because of unforeseen difficulties” and you’ve already resigned…
  • Write a brief, but positive letter to your manager informing him or her of your intention to move on. Take time to say thank you.
  • If it is easy for you to do so, speak face-to-face with your manager to explain the decision. Again, be positive. If there are perceivably negativere sons for your move, be constructive in your explanation.
  • Always maintain your integrity and professionalism throughout the process.

If you’re good, it’s unlikely your employer is going to be overly happy about losing your talents, particularly to a competitor. As a result, you might well be faced with a counter-offer which will likely promise you equal or more money than your potential new position. What to do?

  • Statistically, the majority of people who accept a counter-offer leave within 10 months anyhow.
  • Most people aren’t leaving a position purely to get more money. Yes, of course it’s nice, but there’s usually a lot more reasons that lie behind your decision to move on. Focus on those. They won’t have been changed by your current employer offering you more money.
  • If you’re worth that to them, why weren’t they paying you that in the first place!

Good luck with the process. It can feel hard, but is worth it in the end to move forward. Remember, we’re here to help

Interviews

The interview process can sometimes feel like quite a daunting prospect. However, there’s no need to approach an interview with trepidation. Ultimately you’re there because the company wants to find out about you, and for you to find out more about them, so if you just remember a few key rules, you should find the whole process both informative and enjoyable.

  • Research the company – there’s nothing more impressive to a prospective employer than an interviewee that has clearly made the effort to learn a much as possible about their company. It not only bodes well in terms of your work ethic moving forward, but it also tickles the ego of interviewer. Making people feel good about what they do is always a powerful thing. Conversely, somebody who clearly hasn’t bothered to do their homework will reflect badly.
  • Look the part – professionalism is always key and if you walk in with an untucked shirt or the hair rollers still in, it’s unlikely that professionalism is the image you’ll be projecting!
  • Relaxed confidence – that’s the state of mind you want to hold on to. Remember, you’re there because they want to find out about you, so be confident in yourself and your abilities.
  • Know your answers – although any skilled interviewer won’t stick entirely to a script, it’s worth thinking about your answers to the most commonly asked and obvious questions. For instance, “What are your strengths and weaknesses” is from page 1 of the interviewers script. Be prepared.
  • Ask questions – remember this is an opportunity for you to find out about them too. It’s not a one way street. Come prepared with some questions (though not too many). People love to talk about themselves and their companies too. Ask clever general questions too – a couple of good ones are “what are YOUR favourite and least favourite things about working here” and at the very end, it won’t hurt to ask a ‘closing’ question such as “is there anything you’re unsure about with regard to me that we could go through now?”

Top Tips

  1. Presenting yourself with a positive emphasis is a good thing. It might feel difficult to praise yourself sometimes but remember a CV is a sales tool, and the thing you’re selling is you.
  2. Most people aren’t leaving a position purely to get more money. yes, of course it’s nice, but there’s usually a lot more reasons that lie behind your decision to move on.
  3. Although any skilled interviewer won’t stick entirely to a scipt, it’s worth thinking about your answers to the most commonly asked and obvious questions.